Xylitol for the Ages

Shirley Gutkowski, RDH, BSDH, FACE
Author: Shirley Gutkowski, RDH, BSDH, FACE
Date: 03/08/2011 08:59am
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From broken teeth to decay to large quantities of biofilm on teeth, Angie Stone, RDH, BS, and Shirley Gutkowski, RDH, BSDH, saw a plethora of oral care problems in the residents of a long-term care facility that they visited for their 2008 pilot study. “The amount of biofilm on their teeth was unbelievable,” said Gutkowski.
On the second day of 3 half-day seminars at Xlear’s 3rd Educational Conference on Xylitol, Stone and Gutkowski shared the results of this pilot study—Xylitol in dependent adults—and their recommendations about incorporating xylitol into the daily oral care of long-term care residents

From broken teeth to decay to large quantities of biofilm on teeth, Angie Stone, RDH, BS, and Shirley Gutkowski, RDH, BSDH, saw a plethora of oral care problems in the residents of a long-term care facility that they visited for their 2008 pilot study. “The amount of biofilm on their teeth was unbelievable,” said Gutkowski.
On the second day of 3 half-day seminars at Xlear’s 3rd Educational Conference on Xylitol, Stone and Gutkowski shared the results of this pilot study—Xylitol in dependent adults—and their recommendations about incorporating xylitol into the daily oral care of long-term care residents

Category TagsCariology and Caries Management, Geriatric Dentistry, Infection Prevention, Caries Management

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