Blog

Gail Weisman
Post-Ortho Choices: Black-Eyed Peas or Adele?
Author: Gail Weisman
Date: 05/31/2012 04:04pm

A retainer-like piece of intraoral jewelry differs in one very important way from the boring bling of standard rappers' grillz.  It has a motor that connects to the headphone jack of an iPod that lies flush against the wearer’s palate. To play music, the iPod’s is controlled with the tongue, and, thanks to the pulsing of the motor against your teeth, you hear the music!

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Jason Schwartz
Dental Cool
Date: 05/30/2012 08:08am

Hi again Dental Coolsters. It’s time for your weekly dose of Dental Cool! This week’s post comes from the great folks over at Keystone Industries where they posted a story about how a hearing device uses teeth to aid hearing loss:

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Monica Barudin
Job Outlook for Dental Careers Expected to Grow
Date: 05/29/2012 11:09am

Congratulations class of 2012! Graduation season is in full swing. Dentists, hygienists, dental assistants, and dental laboratory technicians are graduating from their respective dental programs and are now entering the "real world."

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Monica Barudin
Class is Now in Session: My First Dental School Experience
Date: 05/25/2012 02:02pm

I graduated from dental school today; Mini Dental School, that is, at the University of Colorado, created in partnership with the Dental Trade Alliance. Taught by dentists, specialists, and university professors, this 2-day crash course in dentistry covered everything from restorative dentistry to radiology to the business of owning a practice.

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Gail Weisman
Happy 30th, Digital Radiography
Author: Gail Weisman
Date: 05/22/2012 11:04am

The first sensor was born in 1982.

In 1982, a gallon of gas cost about 90 cents, E.T and Gandhi hit the big screen, we were listening to Thriller and Eye of the Tiger on a Walkman, I was pregnant with my first child, and a young French dental student with a jones for physics invented the first digital x-ray sensor.  The young tinkerer from Toulouse was Francis Mouyen (yes, that is him in the photo) and his initial intention was to develop a system he could use during operative procedures and not necessarily to replace film for diagnostic use. His system--RadioVisioGraphy--captured images that could be printed, but not saved or stored. They were viewed on a black-and-white TV-quality monitor (the monitor resolution of personal computers at the time displayed only a limited number of gray shades).

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Bob Alaburda
What a Fun Way to Market Your Practice!
Author: Bob Alaburda
Date: 05/22/2012 10:24am

A German dental practice is putting anxious patients at ease and gaining exposure with tight-fitting, low-cut dresses.

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Jason Schwartz
Dental Cool
Date: 05/21/2012 09:23am

A team of Israeli and German scientists from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces have found an enamel-like layer in the mandibles of freshwater crayfish, according to an article in Nature Communications titled “Enamel-like Apatite Crown Covering Amorphous Mineral in a Crayfish Mandible.”

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Gail Weisman
More Evidence for Prophy Antibiotics Before Dentistry
Author: Gail Weisman
Date: 05/17/2012 09:57am

As a recent and grateful recipient of a shiny new titanium hip, I was interested to read the results of the latest study (you can scroll down to the discussion section where it explains why this study differs from all previous ones) suggesting that bacteria translocate from the periodontium to the synovium (I had to look that one up here).

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Fred Joyal
Broadening Dental Categories to Create More Business
Author: Fred Joyal
Date: 05/17/2012 09:12am

When VCR's first came out, many people predicted it would be the demise of the cinema business. It didn't happen. What did happen is that by 1988, video rentals and sales reached $4 billion annually, passing movie sales, which continued to grow. So what really occurred here is that the category broadened.

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Julie Cullen
The Upside of Dental Plaque
Author: Julie Cullen
Date: 05/16/2012 12:57pm

Yeah, it's hard to imagine an upside to plaque, but researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno, have found some interesting uses for the stuff. G. Richard Scott and Simon R. Poulson recently discovered that  even very small particles of plaque removed from the teeth of ancient populations can supply information about their diets.

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