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Upcoming Events / / Event Details

Tooth Sensitivity Training

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Speaker(s):

Date: 2021-11-09 08:30:00

Location: Online Webinar

Contact Hours: 1 Self Study CE

Event Details

This one hour presentation will delve into techniques and procedures that can help clinicians reduce their post restorative sensitivity and increase tooth nerve survival. By handling pulpal tissues and deep lesions appropriately we can have happy teeth. We are in an era where patients are often not wanting root canals so learning how to prevent them can position you and your practice to help these patients. Materials, techniques and procedures will be presented that have proven to be successful in keeping teeth calm or preventing them from becoming sensitive. Vital pulp capping and safe handling of tissues close to the pulp along with creating predictable final restorations will be the focus of this presentation. Not every tooth that has a deep lesion or a pulp exposure requires a root canal so learn which ones can survive and how to tip the scales towards long term survival.

Learning Objectives
After completing this webinar, participants will be able to:

» Diagnose pulpal health along with strategies for monitoring long term pulpal health

» Understand the steps involved in reducing pulpal tissue response

» Handle deep caries and direct and indirect pulpal exposures

» Maximize their bonds and prevent pulpal sensitivities

Event 6 of 20

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Predictable and Contemporary Cosmetic Dentistry in the 21st Century - Even During and After COVID-19

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Learn critical factors in smile design that help you create beauty and "keep it real."
  • See how veneer cases can be easy to do by always using 4 critical steps.
  • Learn how to utilize technology to help patients see and collaborate on their new smile and "test drive" a smile that increases case acceptance and satisfaction.
  • Discover how laser technology can make your cases esthetically beautiful and biologically healthy, promote healing, and improve your bottom line—even 2 months faster in complex cases.

Abstract

Cosmetic dentistry is no longer a novelty as it was in the 1980s...it is serious business. Patient expectations are growing, so you must learn to master the art and science not only in the front, but the back of the mouth. Fortunately, advancements in technology and materials have allowed dentists and their teams to be on the same page with the patient, lab, and specialists that help you create extraordinary results that are predictable and profitable for the practice, and often affordable for patients. 

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 148 of 157

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Single Tooth Demystified

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

After completing this webinar, participants will be able to:
  • Understand how to properly evaluate, plan, and execute conservative single anterior cases
  • Understand the pros and cons of different material selection for various cases
  • Review bonding protocols to ensure long term stability of restorations

Abstract

One of the most difficult yet rewarding procedures in cosmetic dentistry is the challenge of the single tooth. However, it is not for the faint of heart. Single-tooth dentistry is equal parts frustration and excitement. It requires methodic planning and meticulous attention to detail. Single tooth rarely translates into “simple” tooth dentistry, but that’s what makes them fun! But how do we ensure long-term stability and success of our restorations? Material selection and developing cementation protocols are vital. In this webinar, I will review one of my most difficult single tooth cases to date as well as share my protocols and systems for planning and executing cases, so that you too can achieve gorgeous, conservative, and lasting cosmetic restorations.

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 143 of 157

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

The Routine Use of Incompatible Dental Materials in Dentistry—Why?

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

While reading this course, attendees will learn the following:
1. Oral dysbiosis creates dental diseases that later affect systemic health.
2. Ionic interactions between dental materials may be both beneficial and detrimental to a
restoration’s success.
3. Discrepancies may occur in published research due to a researcher’s failure to
correctly follow manufacturer’s instructions and by using materials in inappropriate
situations.
4. Nonexistent bonds between base and restorative materials weaken the final restoration.
 
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Abstract

The almost universal acceptance of the oral-systemic health link requires that dental professionals be more fully versed in biological sciences, especially microbiology. Dental disease is the result of an oral dysbiosis that later contributes to systemic illness. In addition, dentists now have a plethora of dental materials to choose from, requiring more familiarity with materials science. Further complicating matters is that incompatible materials sometimes are used together. This appears to surprise those with
a thorough background in dental materials, but several important factors contribute to this conundrum. First, popular speakers frequently suggest techniques that they have successfully used with a small number of patients. They assume a positive outcome based on a condensed time frame. Second, the complexity of materials complicates the scenario because of ionic interactions, some of which are less than beneficial. Last, dental students should be exposed to more information about dental materials with an emphasis on critical thinking, and they should be encouraged to question “common knowledge.” Practitioners must keep current with new technology but also be wary of contradictory research and cognizant of possible conflicts of interest. A clinical case with an emphasis on compatible materials provides a step-by-step technique for restoration longevity.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 131 of 157

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Maximizing Outcomes with 21st Century Technologies

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

After completing this webinar, participants will be able to:
• Discover how Guided Biofilm Therapy improves patient and clinician outcomes
• Appraise how the Airflow® Prophylaxis Master capitalizes on the synergy of air, water and powder for gentle yet powerful biofilm removal
• Identify how to maximize outcomes for patients and clinicians with evidence-based innovations
 

Abstract

Guided Biofilm Therapy (GBT) positions clinicians to provide optimal preventive and therapeutic care to their patients, but now discover how to obliterate dysbiotic biofilm, faster and safer than ever before with innovative 21st century technologies. Less is more with innovative technologies that provide enhanced outcomes. Less effort on the part of the clinician for efficient and effective biofilm management. Less noise, reduced weight of handpiece, and less production of aerosol spray making it even safer and easier to use on every patient. Less (almost zero) discomfort for the patient utilizing Erythritol PLUS powder during GBT. Clinicians can maximize clinical outcomes, and maximize positive patient experiences incorporating technologies that have raised the bar on effective biofilm management supra and subgingivally, around delicate restorative materials, and around implants. Position your practice to be the topic of conversation following your patient’s experiences utilizing 21st century technologies. They will never want to return to antiquated methods, and neither will you!
 

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 127 of 157

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Adhesive vs Cohesive. What’s the Difference and When to Implement Which

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

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Educational Objectives

After completing this webinar, participants will be able to:
• Understand adhesive and cohesive dentistry 
• Review preparation designs 
• Update on current bonding principles

Abstract

Our goal as clinicians is to responsibly preserve biologic tissue whilst improving the longevity and the esthetics of our restorations. Basically, our job is to improve on nature without harming it. Adhesive dentistry means bonding. Cohesive means fitting like a lock and key. Adhesive dentistry is typically synonymous with minimally invasive dentistry. When adhesive dentistry is not possible, cohesive dentistry can be used, and sometimes adhesive and cohesive protocols overlap. Thus, a clinician should have an idea, even before a preparation is made, whether a cohesive or an adhesive systematic approach will be used. In this presentation we will mostly focus on the fundamental principles of adhesive dentistry. We will cover which preparation design to use and how, and which materials work best in various situations. We will compare the utmost current and recommended bonding techniques for lithium disilicate and zirconia posterior restorations. We will also revisit cohesive design principals for retention and resistance form in order to understand preparation principles and luting protocols. 

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 102 of 157

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Tooth Sensitivity Training

Categories:

Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

View Video

Educational Objectives

After completing this webinar, participants will be able to:
• Diagnose pulpal health along with strategies for monitoring long term pulpal health
• Understand the steps involved in reducing pulpal tissue response
• Handle deep caries and direct and indirect pulpal exposures
• Maximize their bonds and prevent pulpal sensitivities

Abstract

This one hour presentation will delve into techniques and procedures that can help clinicians reduce their post restorative sensitivity and increase tooth nerve survival. By handling pulpal tissues and deep lesions appropriately we can have happy teeth. We are in an era where patients are often not wanting root canals so learning how to prevent them can position you and your practice to help these patients. Materials, techniques and procedures will be presented that have proven to be successful in keeping teeth calm or preventing them from becoming sensitive. Vital pulp capping and safe handling of tissues close to the pulp along with creating predictable final restorations will be the focus of this presentation. Not every tooth that has a deep lesion or a pulp exposure requires a root canal so learn which ones can survive and how to tip the scales towards long term survival. 
 

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 98 of 157

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Technique Guide to Basic Layering with an Omnichromatic Universal Composite

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

After completing this course, the reader should be able to:

•  Discuss how and when to use an omnichromatic composite

•  Explain the importance and uses of block out with traditional and omnichromatic composite

•  Describe the traditional concepts of composite shade selection.


Download this course PDF

_________________________
 

Abstract

For decades, dentistry has recognized the need to block out (cosmetically mask) deep stains and lingual deficiencies in tooth structure to prevent unsightly show-through. This paper describes past and present concepts in composite resin in general and blocking out in particular. In addition, the paper reviews both the historic and current literature regarding shade selection and multiple shade composite resin systems are described. Use of an omnichromatic composite is detailed, with case reports focusing on its use with its associated blocker. We conclude that in many instances in cosmetic restorative dentistry it is possible to eliminate multiple shades of composite, replacing them with just one omnichromatic shade and, when needed, its associated blocker. 

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT This educational activity is made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Tokuyama

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 66 of 157

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Bioactive Materials A Clinical Perspective

Categories:

Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

After completing this course, participants will be able to understand the concepts of bioactive materials, as well as be able to:
1. Define bioactivity and how it relates to dentistry
2. Understand the history of bioactivity related to dentistry
3. Understand the science behind various bioactive approaches and experimental research
4. Identify the potential benefits of bioactive materials
5. Incorporate bioactive therapy in a clinical restorative setting.
 

Download this course PDF
______________________________

Abstract

Modern bioactive dental materials are pushing the science and art of dentistry to new heights. Techniques and materials are evolving, and the paradigms of treatment have shifted from replacement of tooth and bone structures to actively inducing the human body to work in conjunction with engineered materials to deliver better health outcomes. This article will review the history and development of bioactive materials and include some of the exciting new treatment modalities of modern clinical practice.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORT This educational activity is made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Apex Dental Materials.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 52 of 157

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

FLUORESCENCE-ENHANCED “THERAGNOSIS” for Minimally Invasive Caries Management

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this course is to provide an introduction to fluorescence-enhanced therapy and diagnosis for minimally invasive caries management to maximize hard tissue preservation in the patients’ best interest. The tool, called Reveal, which visualizes the phases of caries, is a loupe and light combination that shines fluorescent light onto teeth under a specified magnification so probing and radiography no longer need to be the only methods of diagnosis. At the conclusion of this course, participants will be able to:
 

  1. Understand the difference between “classic” caries lesion diagnosis and fluorescence-enhanced therapy and diagnosis
  2. Conceptualize minimally invasive caries management and caries therapy combined with diagnosis (theragnosis)
  3. Visually differentiate various phases of active caries lesions
  4. Identify hard tissue worth preserving during minimally invasive caries management
  5. Follow a step-by-step protocol for diagnosis, subsequent differential diagnosis, and then treatment option selection.

 


Download this course PDF

________________________________
 

Abstract

Diagnosis of caries is the prerequisite for treatment choice selection. Management of caries lesions adopted the concept of minimal invasiveness with the goal to conserve as much dental tissue as possible. Classic caries removal does not support the actual concept of minimal invasiveness. New, proven, and evidence-based devices have stepped in, ensuring that the diagnostic process is able to gather all needed information related to any given caries lesion in question to grant a minimally invasive treatment option, leaving as much tooth structure intact as possible and, thereby, facilitating restorative material choice in accordance with the diagnosed caries specifi city. “Theragnosis” combines therapy and diagnosis through fl uorescence-enhanced magnification, making true minimally invasive caries management possible.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Designs for Visions, Inc

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 43 of 157