Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Super-Easy, In-House Orthodontic Aligners

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

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Educational Objectives

  • Compare the cost and time savings that can be achieved by producing aligners in-house 
  • Identify which equipment and materials are needed for aligner production
  • Decribe the complete workflow—from scanning, designing, 3D printing, and manufacturing—and how these steps can be delegated to staff

Abstract

You love aligner orthodontics, but are you concerned about the high lab fees that most popular companies charge? With in-house 3D printing, you can stop paying those fees and gain more independence and control over manufacturing (and tooth movement). Most professionals believe this process is too labor intensive, but it actually isn’t.

Dr. Joshua Howard will show you how easy it is to produce quality aligners with digital scanning and in-house 3D printing. He’ll show you how to delegate steps to dental assistants and how to get your whole dental team on board with a digital workflow. By the end of the webinar, you’ll know the proper equipment, materials, and techniques you need to be successful.

Supported through an unrestricted educational grant from Formlabs Dental

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 123 of 124

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CASE PRESENTATION: A Simple Approach to Indirect Bonding in Orthodontics

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Date: 05-18-2020 11:17:53 am

Precision bracket placement in orthodontics can be a challenge with even the most cooperative of patients. Tough visibility, poor isolation, and an active tongue are some of the many challenges when trying to place orthodontic brackets. Indirect bonding technique allows for accurate and precise bracket placement on a model that can then be transferred to the patient for quick, efficient, and precise bracket placement. Multiple techniques can be utilized for indirect bonding. The following cases utilize an in-office workflow that can be incorporated into everyday practice, avoiding costly lab bills and shortening initial bonding appointments.

Laboratory Procedure

High-quality alginate impressions should be taken at the appointment prior to bonding. Models can be fabricated in Microstone or Laboratory Plaster (Whip Mix). Two coats of Al-Cote Separating Agent (Dentsply Sirona) are applied to the models and allowed to dry—this will ensure the sectional trays can be removed from the models. The long access and height of contour of each tooth can be marked with a pencil to allow for easy visualization during bracket placement.

Orthodontic brackets (Empower Self-Ligating, American Orthodontics) are then positioned on the models in the ideal position, utilizing orthodontic bracket adhesive (Transbond Adhesive, 3M). The brackets are then light-cured on the model (FlashMax P4 LED curing light, Rocky Mountain Orthodontics). A thin layer of model separator (Great Lakes Separator, Great Lakes Orthodontics) is applied to the brackets and to the occlusal surface of the models. Low-temperature hot glue is used to fabricate sectional trays and is readily available from any hobby store. The occlusal surface of the models and one-half of the bracket, including the slot, should be covered with the hot glue. The models are then soaked in warm water to remove the sectional trays; the brackets should remain in the sectional tray when removed. The sectional trays can then be placed in a small container with water and liquid dish soap in the ultrasonic to remove any pieces of plaster that may have adhered, then thoroughly rinsed with water. All sectional trays should be thoroughly dried prior to use.

Clinical Procedure

Standard isolation was achieved utilizing an OptraGate (Ivoclar Vivadent), and 35% phosphoric acid etch (Ultra-Etch, Ultradent) was applied to the bonding surfaces of the teeth, then rinsed and primer applied (Transbond Primer, 3M) and light-cured. A small amount of flowable adhesive (Transbond Supreme LV Low Viscosity Light Cure Adhesive, 3M) is applied to the adhesive on the bracket pads, and sectional trays are transferred to the mouth. The sectional trays are held firmly against the teeth as they are light-cured. Sectional trays are then removed using a scaler and a pealing motion, and brackets are light-cured again. Excess composite is then removed using a scaler or carbide finishing bur.
 

 

Article 22 of 39

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

INTRAORAL SCANNING: Improving Efficiency and Advanced Workflow

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

After completing this course, participants will be able to identify the potential advantages of digital impression systems over conventional impressions, as well as be able to:
  1. Comprehend how digital impressions are being used to fabricate dental restorations
  2. Understand how digital impressions are impacting orthodontics
  3. Learn how digital impressions are being used in implantology
  4. Recognize the potential benefits of CAD/CAM technologies
  5. See the potential in diagnostics and communication with patients.

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______________________________

Abstract

Digital impressions are reshaping the way modern dentistry is being practiced. They are able to eliminate some of the issues found with conventional workflow and provide clinicians with unique advantages compared to traditional impression techniques. With various implications in the field, digital scanners are making their mark on the profession. This article will review some of the advantages of digital impression systems over their conventional counterparts, as well as review how they are currently being used in practice today.

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This educational activity is made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Align Technologies.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 79 of 124

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

External Apical Root Resorption

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide the readers with information on the latest evidence regarding EARR during orthodontic treatment. After reading this article, the reader will be able to:
 
  1. Understand why EARR occurs during orthodontic treatments
  2. Learn how to assess EARR
  3. Identify the diagnostic factors that cause EARR
  4. Determine what treatment factors cause EARR
  5. Specify how to manage EARR clinically.

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________________________________

Abstract

External apical root resorption (EARR) is frequently observed during orthodontic treatment; it can require a pause or termination of the treatment in the patient’s best interest. If the root length is reduced severely, it also affects the decisions regarding other dental procedures, for instance, prosthetic restorations. Thus, EARR should be assessed and managed properly throughout orthodontic treatment and its etiology should be fully understood. Although more detailed information of roots can be obtained with the latest technology, it is difficult to clarify which diagnostic or treatment factors cause EARR due to its multifactorial nature. Therefore, it is important to keep abreast of the latest evidence to avoid unnecessary EARR. This article will provide the readers with information about EARR during orthodontic treatment.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 76 of 124

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Clear Aligners and Sleep Disorders

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

Clear Aligners and Sleep Disorders

The goal of this continuing education (CE) activity is to provide readers with an understanding of how to incorporate clear aligner therapy into their practice, in order to address the needs of patients diagnosed with sleep-related breathing disorders who require orthodontic intervention. Upon completion of this activity, the reader should be able to:
1. Review appropriate screening protocols.
2. Identify the correlation between malocclusions and airway deficiencies.
3. Understand how to provide patients with comprehensive treatment options to address sleep-related breathing disorders.
4. Discuss the appropriate use of clear aligners for combination cases utilizing the Aligner Sleep Appliance.
5. Recognize the benefits of incorporating 3D technology into the development of comprehensive treatment plans.

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_______________________________________

Abstract

Treatment methods are now available that address the needs of the large number of patients who require orthodontic clear aligner therapy and have been diagnosed with sleep-related breathing disorders. When indicated, an effective treatment for these conditions can be accomplished by correcting malocclusions with the use of clear aligners throughout both active and retention phase treatment, as well as by addressing the individual’s breathing disorders with a dental sleep appliance that fits over the clear aligners. With the use of this process, the patient avoids having to complete orthodontic treatment prior to treating his or her sleep disorder, which can be a potentially life-threatening condition.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 57 of 124

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Impacted Canines: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Management

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienist, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information on impacted canines. After completing this article, the reader will be able to:

1. Describe the radiographic investigations that may be required to assess impacted canines
2. List etiological factors for impacted canines
3. Review the rationale for interceptive orthodontics and methods used in intercepting impacted canines
4. List and describe treatment options and considerations involved in the treatment of impacted canines.

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_________________________________________

Abstract

Impacted canines are frequently encountered in clinical practice and a common obstacle during routine orthodontic care. While canine impaction is multifactorial, the exact etiology is not always known. Impacted canines should be identified and diagnosed as early as possible to determine and permit the best path of treatment. In some cases, interceptive orthodontics at a young age can resolve canine impaction; for example, by extracting the primary canine and/or the primary first molar. Treatment options for impacted canines include extraction of primary canines and molars, rapid maxillary expansion, canine substitution, autotransplantation, surgical exposure, and orthodontic extrusion, and for those with a poor prognosis, extraction.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 45 of 124

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Clear Aligner Therapy and the Orthodontic-Restorative Interface

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Author(s):

Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists from novice to advanced

Educational Objectives

Enhancing Restorative Outcomes with Clear Aligner Therapy 

Educational Objectives

The overall goal of this course is to provide information on clear aligner therapy and its application in enhancing restorative outcomes and treating crowding. After completing this article, the reader will be able to:
1. Describe the types of movements that can be achieved using clear aligners.
2. Review the digital workflow for clear aligner therapy.
3. Define the role of auxiliaries and describe how these are used for clear aligner therapy.
4. Delineate the potential benefits of clear aligner therapy for patients, including those requiring restorative care.

Download this course PDF
_____________________________________

Abstract

Clear aligner therapy improves esthetics during orthodontic care in comparison to fixed orthodontic appliances and standard removable appliances. In part due to this, the number of adults seeking orthodontic treatment has increased, and clear aligner therapy is now frequently performed on adults and adolescents. The availability of auxiliaries/composite attachments has also improved the level of control and types of tooth movements that can be attained using clear aligners. In addition, there is less risk of gingivitis, caries, and oral irritations with clear aligner therapy than is associated with fixed orthodontic appliance therapy. Clear aligner therapy involves a digital workflow for treatment planning, and is also used to enhance restorative care by providing for space/repositioning teeth to improve potential results and/or minimize the invasiveness or extent of restorative care required to achieve the desired result, and may also reduce the duration of treatment.

 

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from ClearCorrect.

ADA Credits: 2 | AGD Credits: 2 | Cost: $29.00

Course 40 of 124

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Predictable and Proactive Minimally Invasive Dentistry

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Target Audience: Dental Students, Dentists

Duration: 40:04

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Synopsis

Minimally invasive dentistry is gentler and patient-friendly, and preserves tooth structure. By proactively and predictably practicing minimally invasive dentistry, tooth structure is preserved. Newer materials and techniques make it easy to practice and patients prefer being treated in an office that practices minimally invasive dentistry. It's a great practice builder and often faster than traditional dentistry.

Get CE credit for this course here: http://dentallearning.net/predictable-and-proactive-minimally-invasive-dentistry

Videos 21 of 42

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Conserving Tooth Structure for Better Results and Other Pearls for Practicing

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Target Audience: Dental Students, Dentists

Duration: 1:18:37

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Synopsis

The importance of preserving tooth structure and its connection to long-term clinical success. We will discuss better crown preps and the importance of ferrule in the adhesive age, removing zirconia and obtaining access through zirconia restorations, treating cervical lesions, why we need to maintain cervical tooth structure, tips & tricks for easier class II restorations, cavity preparation: what should we remove and what can we leave, minimally invasive restorative care, endo access and instrumentation for tooth preservation, when and why posts may be needed in endo restorations and when can we avoid them

Get CE credit for this course here: http://dentallearning.net/conserving-tooth-structure-better-results-and-other-pearls-practicing

COMMERCIAL SUPPORTER: This course has been made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from SS White.

Videos 18 of 42

Online Continuing Education / Course Details

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Conserving Tooth Structure for Better Results and Other Pearls for Practicing

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Course Type: Self-instruction journal and web based activity

Target Audience: Dental Assistants, Dentists from novice to advanced

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Educational Objectives

After completing this webinar, participants will be able to:

• Describe why cervical tooth structure dictates the tooth's longevity

• List and describe methods to preserve tooth structure to improve restoration success

• Explain how to remove or access through zirconia restorations with less stress

• Review crown preparation and endo restoration from an engineering standpoint

Abstract

The importance of preserving tooth structure and its connection to long-term clinical success. We will discuss:

•Better crown preps and the importance of ferrule in the adhesive age

•Removing zirconia and obtaining access through zirconia restorations

•Treating cervical lesions

•Why we need to maintain cervical tooth structure

•Tips & tricks for easier class II restorations

•Cavity preparation: what should we remove and what can we leave

•Minimally invasive restorative care

•Endo access and instrumentation for tooth preservation

•When and why posts may be needed in endo restorations and when can we avoid them

ADA Credits: 1 | AGD Credits: 1 | Cost: $19.00

Course 9 of 124